10 Car Brands that are American

Today marks the 21st anniversary of the release of Independence Day, a movie that captured the hearts and minds of Americans all over the world. To celebrate, I've compiled a list of 10 car manufacturers that were founded in the good old United States.


10. Saleen

Saleen is a company so American that it was founded by a guy named Steve. For 30 years, Saleen has been showing the potential of brave capitalists to repackage an existing product, then mark it up for twice the price.


9. Nash

Photo by David John Austin

Photo by David John Austin

Before Crosby and Stills came along, Nash was known as the car for the average American family. The Metropolitan was  known as the Nissan Versa of it's time. Nash also pioneered innovations like overhead valves, and the unibody chassis. The company was so patriotic, it morphed into the American Motor Company, and has been kicking Commie Euro-trash ass ever since.


8. Panoz

Photo by Bill Weiss

Photo by Bill Weiss

I gotta admit. I've never actually seen a Panoz car, or know anyone else that has, but I do remember one of them being in Forza Motorsport 3. I also remember there was a little American flag next to the car's name.


7. Eagle

Eagle was conceived in 1988 as the corner of Chrysler dealerships to shove unwanted Mitsubishi and Renault stock. With a  name like Eagle, you'd think they'd sell like flapjacks, but the unpatriotic public of the 90's failed to take notice, and Eagle was quietly swept under the rug in 1999.


6. DMC

Photo by Grenex

Photo by Grenex

Just like New York's mighty skyscrapers, The DeLorean is mostly steel, and was cobbled together by cheap Irish labor. Unfortunately, demand for the car just wasn't there. Instead of going to the government for a bailout, like the cowards at GM, John DeLorean turned to selling more illicit goods. In the end, not even cocaine, the fuel of the 1980's economic boom, could save DMC.


5. SRT

Remember when SRT was its own brand for like 6 months? I really don't know what they were thinking with that decision. It didn't even amount to anything. They still sold the same go-fast Chargers, and Grand Cherokees. The only real difference is that you'd have some dweeb show up online to correct you, every time you made the mistake of typing the words, "Dodge Viper."


4. Geo

I'm pretty sure Geo is American. It was a subsidiary of GM its entire life. Most of their cars were rebadged Toyotas and Suzukis. But, I mean, what's more American than stealing Japanese creations? The Geo Metro is kind of like a big California Roll when you think about it.


3. Edsel

Photo by Michael Kistinger edsel.kistinger.com

Photo by Michael Kistinger edsel.kistinger.com

50 years before the Bugatti Veyron, the Edsel had the whole "fish lips" look down pat. Unfortunately, it was way too ahead of its time. While a Veyron goes for over a Million, you can pick up an Edsel for a cool $800 on the fifth page of Craigslist.


2. Packard

Photo by Lars-Göran Lindgren

Photo by Lars-Göran Lindgren

True story, my Grandfather was almost killed when a Packard transmission fell on top of him. In another timeline, a Packard car is directly responsible for me not being born. It's scary to think about, and it makes me glad that the company is no longer exists. Good riddance, I say.


1. Plymouth

Photo by Ildar Sagdejev 

Photo by Ildar Sagdejev 

Plymouth is the epitome of 90's Chrysler engineering. With so many great cars coming out, like the Neon, the Prowler, and the PT Cruiser, you'd think Plymouth were on top of their game, but it wasn't meant to be. In 2001, just before the Daimler merger, the bean counters at Chrysler took Plymouth out back and shot them. A move that I'm sure they're regretting to this very day.